Meet our Founders

 
 
 
 

Rabbi Irwin Kula

Co-Founder

Rabbi Irwin Kula is a disruptive spiritual innovator and rogue thinker. A 7th generation rabbi he is Co-President of Clal–The National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership a do-tank committed to making Jewish a Public Good. A thought leader on the intersection of innovation, religion, and human flourishing, Irwin has worked with leaders from the Dalai Lama to Queen Noor and with organizations, foundations, and businesses in the United States and around the world to inspire people to live with greater passion, purpose, creativity, and compassion.

 

CRAIG HATKOFF

Co-Chair

Craig Hatkoff is co-founder of the Tribeca Film Festival, as well as the Disruptor Foundation and annual Tribeca Disruptive Innovation Awards, two collaborations with father of disruptive innovation theory Harvard Business School Professor Clayton Christensen. Hatkoff began his career at Chemical Bank where he was a pioneer of the real estate securitization industry and went on to co-found Capital Trust before serving as a chairman and board member. He left Capital Trust in 2000 to pursue his passion for entrepreneurial and creative endeavors focused in the field of disruptive innovation. In addition, Hatkoff is a Director of both Taubman Centers, Inc. and SL Green Realty Corporation, and serves on a number of Boards including Tribeca Film Institute, Desmond Tutu Peace Foundation, Child Mind Institute, Wild Bird Fund and the Borough of Manhattan Community College Foundation. He is also a co-author and founder of Turtle Pond Publications, a leading publisher of Scholastic children’s books including #1 New York Times bestseller Owen & Mzee. Craig graduated from Colgate University in 1976 and received his MBA from Columbia University 1978. He is currently Adjunct Professor at Columbia Business School where he created and teaches the course on Disruptive Innovation.

 

CLAYTON M. CHRISTESEN

Co-Founder

Professor Christensen holds a B.A. from Brigham Young University and an M.Phil. in applied econometrics from Oxford University where he studied as a Rhodes Scholar. He received an MBA and a DBA from the Harvard Business School, where he is currently the Kim B. Clark Professor of Business Administration. He also is a Senior Lecturer in Radiology at the Harvard Medical School. He is regarded as one of the world’s top experts on innovation and growth. Christensen founded a number of successful companies and organizations which use his theories in various ways. These include: Innosight, a consulting firm helping companies create new growth businesses; Rose Park Advisors, a firm that identifies and invests in disruptive companies; and The Christensen Institute, a non-profit think tank whose mission is to apply his theories to vexing societal problems such as healthcare, education, and economic growth. Professor Christensen is the best-selling author of eleven books and several hundred articles, including the New York Times best-selling, How Will You Measure Your Life?. The Economist magazine named The Innovator’s Dilemma as one of the six most important books about business ever written. A biannual poll of thousands of executives, consultants and business school professors in 2011 and again in 2013 named Christensen as the most influential business thinker in the world. He received the 2015 Edison Achievement Award for his significant and lasting contributions to innovation. Professor Christensen was born in Salt Lake City, Utah. He worked as missionary for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in the Republic of Korea from 1971 to 1973 and continues to serve in his church in as many ways as he can. He and his wife Christine live in Belmont, MA. They are the parents of five children and grandparents to six grandchildren.